Vertigo Causes

Vertigo can be caused by problems in the brain or the inner ear.

  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) – the most common form of vertigo and is characterized by the sensation of motion initiated by sudden head movements or moving the head in a certain direction. This type of vertigo is rarely serious and can be treated.
  • Labyrinthitis or vestibular neuritis – Vertigo may also be caused by inflammation within the inner ar, which is characterized by the sudden onset of vertigo and may be associated with hearing loss. The most common cause of labyrinthitis is a viral or bacterial inner ear infection.
  • Meniere’s disease – composed of a triad of symptoms including: episodes of vertigo, ringing in the ears (tinnitis), and hearing loss. People with this condition have the abrupt onset of severe vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss, as well as periods in which they are symptom-free.
  • Acoustic neuroma – a type of tumor of the nerve tissue that can cause vertigo. Symptoms include vertigo with one-sided ringing in the ear and hearing loss.
  • Perilymph Fistula – a tear or defect in one or both of the small, thin membranes between the middle and inner ears. Causes a direct affect on the inner ear balance system when changes in air pressure (as in an airplane) that normally only affect the middle ear can now impact the inner ear.
  • Vertigo can be caused by decreased blood flow to the base of the brain. Bleeding into the back of the brain (cerebellar hemorrhage) is characterized by vertigo, headache, difficulty walking, and inability to look toward the side of the bleed. The result is that the person’s eyes gaze away from the side with the problem. Walking is also extremely impaired.
  • Vertigo is often the presenting symptom in multiple sclerosis. The onset is usually abrupt, and examination of the eyes may reveal the inability of the eyes to move past the midline toward the nose.
  • Head trauma and neck injury may also result in vertigo, which usually goes away on its own.
  • Migraine, a severe form of headache, may also cause vertigo. The vertigo is usually followed by a headache. There is often a prior history of similar episodes but no lasting problems.
  • Complications from diabetes can cause arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) which can lead to lowered blood flow to the brain, causing vertigo symptoms.

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  1. Pingback: As the World Turns | neurochangers

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